GigaOM Podcasts

Categories

general
Technology
media

Archives

2014
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2013
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2012
December
November
October
September

August 2014
S M T W T F S
     
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31

Syndication

Most observers would say Box is in a tough spot.  MicrosoftGoogle and now Amazon have barged onto its turf of business-focused file sync, share and management. That's got to be worrisome even if some of those services aren't as slick as Box's.

This week's guest, [company]Box[/company] co-founder and CEO Aaron Levie, acknowledges the concern, but maintains that Box's ability to work across operating systems, devices and applications, makes it more able to meet user requirements -- what a concept -- than the big platform guys that have other agendas -- like locking users into using more of their stuff. The API economy makes it possible for  more focused and innovative companies to build products that integrate with other applications users want. We also ask what's up with the Box IPO. (Hey, it's our job.)

Box CEO Aaron Levie
Box CEO Aaron Levie

 

Levie also cues up BoxWorks 2014 coming up in a few weeks starts in a segment that starts at around minute 9. But if you want to hear about former Microsoft CEO (and director) Steve Ballmer's new gig as Clippers owner or why [company]Google[/company] bought image recognition specialist Jetpac or  VMware's product naming travails, listen to the whole shebang.

Direct download: 082014_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00 AM

Direct download: 081914_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:Technology -- posted at: 12:08 PM

Cellular connections are expensive and the plans aren't always conducive to connecting 1,000 devices in a go, but that is changing argues Eran Eshed, Co-Founder and VP of Marketing & Business Development, Altair Semiconductor in this week's podcast. Eshed makes a case for cellular as a real answer to connectivity for the internet of things, especially for industrial customers. I'm not sure I'm convinced, but he did address range issues, the cost of the modems inside devices and more.

Kevin Tofel and I also discussed what was a busy week in smart home hubs with Samsung buying SmartThings for a reported $200 million, the launch of Best Buy's home hub (a collaboration between the retailer and a startup selling a service called Peq) and the news that Home Depot is putting its considerable muscle behind the Wink platform. We also discuss the new white Philips LED connected bulbs and their $30 price tag, which means that the price of connected bulbs is coming down. So listen up to see how Kevin views the Samsung buy of SmartThings, the thought of four home platforms and more.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Kevin Tofel and Eran Eshed, Co-Founder and VP of Marketing & Business Development, Altair Semiconductor

  • Kevin thinks Samsung is likely to keep SmartThings open so isn't worried
  • Maybe the smart home can handle a few big closed systems
  • Home Depot's push for Wink makes sense for it and the consumer
  • Cellular may be expensive, but carriers are making it much cheaper with 4G-only service
  • The industrial internet isn't going to rely on Wi-Fi
Direct download: 081814_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00 AM

When he quit his paying job and needed a new gig, Chris Aker started [company]Linode[/company] in 2003, well before any of the public cloud providers showed up. And Linode, a conflation of "Linux" and "node,"  which he initially ran out of his bedroom, became an early fan favorite among developers needing an easy way to create and run workloads. Here he talks about why he's not wild about Linode being characterized as a virtual private server company as opposed to a cloud provider, which he calls a distinction without a real difference except for marketing purposes.

Linode, he said, makes it easier for customres to buy all-in-one easy to consume nodes -- with bandwidth etc included. In April Linode garnered $45 million in new funding to fund a pretty impressive infrastructure overhaul including new SSD drives, doubled RAM capacity, the latest Intel chips and 40GB networking.

Check out our chat to learn why The Onion is a great customer for Linode, but also a scary one.

Linode Founder Chris Aker.
Linode Founder Chris Aker.

Derrick Harris and I also go off on a tangent about the use (and potential abuse) of data analytics by major sports franchises and why we're happy that Yahoo is serious about R&D with its revitalized Yahoo Labs but how it better be very, very careful not to screw up [company]Yahoo[/company] Finance. But if it could combone Flickr photo and perhaps video search with that dashboard, we would be very, very happy. (Hint hint.)

 

So check out this week's show.

SHOW NOTES

Hosts: Barb Darrow and Derrick Harris

Direct download: 081314_02-audio.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:56 AM

Maybe it's time for us to grow up a bit and recognize that two or three companies that have the ability to invest in creating an awesome user experience will control the destiny of the consumer-oriented internet of things. The experience won't be built on one standard as we hope. Of course, the companies will provide that platform are still up in the air, according to Tom Coates, the co-founder of stealthy startup Product Club and the man behind the @HouseofCoates Twitter account.

In this week's podcast he and I discuss what the above topic, as well as what a device that helps make the smart home into a mainstream desire could look like. He also tells me why we're no closer to any rules about the use of our personal data. Many of his conclusions mirror our own at the show; so far the internet of things is pretty clunky for mainstream users. Meanwhile, my colleague Kevin Tofel and I talk about the Hue tap light switchPhilips teaming up with Accenture to use consumer connected devices to make it easier for patients with ALS to communicate, and a primer on Android Fit and Android Wear.

Listen up, and if you like the podcast, make sure you send Coates a friendly tweet. He says he never gets those.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Kevin Tofel and Tom Coates of Product Club

  • That clicking noise you hear is our initial take on the Hue tap wall switch (pictured above)
  • How we could use wearables, sensors and connected devices to help people with certain diseases communicate
  • Why the internet won't be open like the web
  • No one is using the internet of things, so no one cares yet about their data
  • Connected devices will come, but we need a magical device or service to make consumers love them
Direct download: 081114_01-audio.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:59 AM

Brad Feld just came out and said what some still deem unthinkable: Amazon(s amzn) Web Services is not always the lowest cost provider. Not since Google(s goog) and Microsoft(s msft) hit the public cloud arena like gale force winds. And not for many startups that have hit a certain monthly IT spend -- $200,000? -- and might be better off looking at other options, including bare metal or in-house servers.

Still, many users won't care. The CIA, after all, went with AWS even after it was underbid by IBM(s ibm) on that cloud contract. But being the low-cost provider is part of Amazon's DNA and acting in ways contrary to that trait causes problems for it, Feld noted.

Feld, who is managing director for The Foundry Group and co-founder of TechStars, blogged about this last week -- referencing some of Gigaom's coverage of Amazon's challenges -- and talks more about the topic on this week's show.

Before you get all riled up, no one is disrespecting what Amazon -- which blazed the public cloud category and churns out new services at a fast clip -- has accomplished. But markets change and this competitive landscape is most certainly shifting. Feld's a fun guy to talk to, so make sure to listen up to at least about minute 10 if you're in a hurry.

Derrick Harris and I also discuss the evils of shelfware in the cloud era and Docker's upcoming funding round. I mean, is it really any surprise that this company is drawing huge interest (and potentially big VC dollars)?

Foundry Group's Brad Feld
Foundry Group's Brad Feld

SHOW NOTES

Hosts: Barb Darrow and Derrick Harris

Direct download: 080614_01_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:37 PM

Direct download: Chrome_Show-08072014.mp3
Category:Technology -- posted at: 2:24 PM

The company behind a $99, color-changing light bulb that so far plans to work with Nest and Apple's HomeKit is also building out a platform of it's own with a switch that may one day act as an interface for the internet of things. But unlike Nest or Apple, Phil Bosura, the CEO of LIFX, hopes that the internet of things doesn't need an OS or force customers to choose a platform. In this week's podcast he talks about his hopes for Wi-Fi and the AllSeen Alliance that is pushing the AllJoyn standard as a means to make the internet of things truly interoperable.

But before we discuss lightbulbs and why Bosura thinks Zigbee is the equivalent of Macromedia's Flash software, Derrick Harris takes a turn as my co-host to discuss artificial intelligence and whether or not we already have robots controlling the internet of things in our home. There's a lot of dig into this week, so tune in and chill out.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Derrick Harris and Phil Bosura, CEO of LIFX

    • When will we get the Rosie robot form the Jetsons in our homes?
    • The role machine learning and AI have on IoT
    • What is LIFX and what will they build next?
    • Wi-Fi is where it's at and Zigbee is like Flash back in the pre-iPad days.
    • The internet of things is the platform, which is why LIFX loves AllJoyn
Direct download: 080414_03-audio.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00 AM

Hortonworks and Cloudera have been in a big-time arms race -- each raking in big bucks from a series  big backers -- the latest skirmish was Hewlett-Packard's(s hpq) $50 million investment in Hortonworks.

This week's guest Hortonworks CEO Rob Bearden explains what all the Hadoop hubbub's about.

Rob Bearden at Structure Data 2014.
Rob Bearden at Structure Data 2014.

But first, there's tectonic moving and shaking in public cloud with a three-way price-cut roundalay means that Amazon(s amzn) Web Services won't always be the initiator and will have to respond to cuts Google(s goog) and Microsoft(s msft).

That alone has changed the complexion of the market. And, why, exactly Twitter, which is in a bit of an arms race of its own, needed to buy Madbits.

 

 

SHOW NOTES

Hosts: Barb Darrow and Derrick Harris

Direct download: 073014_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:48 AM

In my connected home I've focused mostly on automation, but Stephen Sorkin, the chief strategy officer at Splunk has decided to go a much nerdier route. He focused on data, specifically gathering data from his circuit breaker, his connected weather station and his pool. He sends that data to Splunk and has used it to make some starting conclusions -- among them that his home generates about 200 MB of data a day.

In this week's podcast Sorkin discusses how he is using data to make decisions about when to water his lawn and when to replace ol inefficient appliances. It's one thing to guess that a new washer or dryer will save you money, but Sorkin has the data to prove it. We discuss this and why users should be in control of their data. And Kevin Tofel was on vacation this week, but my colleague Kevin Fitchard joined us to talk about the Wink hub, the connected kitchen and new networks for the internet of things. Listen up.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Kevin Fitchard and Stephen Sorkin of Splunk

  • A few thoughts on Wink. It has Lutron and a nice interface
  • Stop trying to push the iOS v. Android worldview on the internet of things
  • Does the internet of things need cellular networks?
  • Why open data is not just useful, but essential
  • Tips to monitor your electric meter and pool
Direct download: 072814_02-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:25 AM