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October 2014
S M T W T F S
     
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Syndication

Skeptics and smart asses (raising hand here) contend that any cloud delivered by a hardware provider is immediately suspect because it's just a way for that vendor to sell more of that aforementioned hardware. There is some validity to that theory but there is also nuance. For example, most legacy hardware businesses are now fully into the software game. Count EMC among them.

As Jeremy Burton, president of product and marketing for the Hopkinton, Mass.-based storage giant, says on this week's show: "Old images die hard ... I have about 15,000 people that work for me, 300 of them do hardware ... but hardware is just a wrapper to deliver the software."

EMC's storage expertise -- in hardware and software -- is the foundation of its newly announced hybrid cloud strategy. Viper, EMC's software-defined storage layer and DSSD, the super-secret Flash storage startup EMC bought about 8 months ago, will play a big role in the internet of things era as companies demand more real-time information processing, Burton said.

While EMC hasn't talked much at all about what's going on with DSSD, that will start to change soonish. "You'll start hearing next year about how this [technology] offers mind-blowing performance and latencies really geared to in-memory databases that process streams of data coming from mobile devices," Burton said. "That super-high-performance will complement the commodity infrastructure that we have underneath Viper, that sits beneath Hadoop."

DSSD will work hand-in-glove the Pivotal application and data fabric to underlie next-gen apps, Burton said. Unlike traditional storage arrays, DSSD will talk "native HDDS" to the applications. "It doesn't smell like a storage array, it doestn' talk iSCSI or Fibre Channel, it talks natively what the application speaks. And a lot of the services it enables we will provide ultimately through Pivotal Cloud Foundry PaaS layer,"he added.

Intrigued? Well there's lots more here from Burton about how EMC's recent acquisitions of Cloudscaling, Spanning and Maginetics fit into its cloud plans.

Burton's segment starts about 12 minutes in. In the first segment, Derrick Harris and I discuss the IBM-and-Twitter partnership that, at first blush, seemed odd, but when you think about it makes absolutely great sense for both parties.

 

 

 

Jeremy Burton, EMC president of product and marketing.
Jeremy Burton, EMC president of product and marketing.
Direct download: 102914_01-audio.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:01 PM

Getting things online is an essential element of the internet of things, but the way that people can do it is expanding greatly. In this week's podcast my colleague Kevin Fitchard and I discuss how companies like Facebook are expanding internet access, how companies like Fon are building data-sharing services on top of Wi-Fi and how peer-to-peer networks can make the internet of things more available, cheaper and resilient.

We also are including a panel from our Structure Connect show last week that features Kate Drane from Indiegogo and Rachel Chalmers from Ignition Partners discussing how to avoid alienating your crowdfunding backers in case of a sale, as well as whether or not an entrepreneur should take venture capital. So put in your headphones or glide into the HOV lane and enjoy the show.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Kevin Fitchard and a reprise of a Structure Connect panel featuring Tom Krazit, Rachel Chalmers of Ignition Partners and Kate Drane of Indigogo.

  • The secret to Facebook's Itnernet.org isn't drones, it's carriers
  • How peer-to-peer networks could help establish cheaper connections for IoT
  • Will Ford sell cars or transportation?
  • How to avoid a crowdfunding disaster after an exit event
  • Do you really want venture capital?
Direct download: 102714_02-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:25 AM

So much news so little time.

On this week's Structure Show we talk about Microsoft's latest cloud moves including the beefiest cloud servers known to man (so far, but give it a second); a new Azure-in-a-box appliance-- which [company]Microsoft[/company] hopes will do better than its last attempt.

Meanwhile [company]Amazon[/company] beefed up its hybrid cloud story with  AWS Directory Services. Your play [company]Google[/company].

Also the return of the Netezza braintrust -- they're back, this time for big data.

 

Scott Guthrie and Satya Nadella.
Scott Guthrie and Satya Nadella.

And, hear the latest about smarter, more connected cities and why these efforts can help us live better. If you want a walkable city, for example, you probably need sensored sidewalks

Direct download: 102214_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:57 AM

If you imagine 50 billion connected devices all consuming a few milliwatts of power, it adds up. With that in mind, we brought Oleg Logvinov, director, market development at ST Microelectronics and who currently serves on the IEEE Standards Association Corporate Advisory Group, on this week's podcast to discuss strategies from the silicon up for making the internet of things more energy efficient.

Before Logvinov discusses both technologies and standards for cutting electricity usage and makes the case that even wired devices should consume less, Kevin Tofel and I talk about the previous week's news including the August lock, the future of Bluetooth as a standard in the connected home, and Qualcomm's planned buy of CSR. Stay tuned.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Kevin Tofel and Rafi Haladjian, CEO of Sen.se.

Direct download: IOT_102014_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00 AM

Another week, another Structure Show podcast. In this week's installment, Gigaom reporter Jonathan Vanian and I cover a broad spectrum of issues, from the Poodle bug to the Microsoft-Docker relationship, and the growing attempt by big data companies to prove their technologies can run nicely in the cloud.

And because a week can't go by without some OpenStack news, we also touch on the acquisition of OpenStack startup Cloudscaling by storage giant EMC.

Max Schireson. Source: MongoDB
Max Schireson. Source: MongoDB

Our guest this week is Max Schireson, the vice chairman of MongoDB who ceded his CEO role earlier this summer in order to spend less time traveling and more time with his family. Two months after the move was announced, we speak with him about how it's going, the reaction he received to a viral blog post about his decision, and the importance of understanding that fathers are important members of the family, too.

Coming on the heels of some interesting moves by MongoDB -- including a new cloud management service announced this week -- we also speak about the company's history, its strategy and its ultimate role in a database market worth many billions of dollars.

 

Direct download: 101514_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:56 AM

We've discussed Google's long-term Chrome strategy for more than a year, suggesting that the Chrome browser would become a framework for Google to boost desktop engagement. This week saw another step towards that goal with a standalone Hangouts app for Windows and Chrome OS with support for Mac OS X in the works. A clue in the Chromium tracker indicates that Google Play Music may be the next such app.

We talk about this in more detail in our weekly Chrome Show podcast, also chatting about some Chromecast developments as well as an easier way to get Android apps running on your own Chrome OS device using a -- you guessed it -- standalone Chrome app.

SHOW NOTES:

Hosts: Janko Roettgers and Kevin C. Tofel

Direct download: 101413-01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:27 AM

Almost a decade ago Rafi Haladjian saw that ubiquitous Wi-Fi in homes and cheap electronics meant that the internet could become part of everything, so he built Nabaztag, a connected bunny that would interact with people. It was meant to be a connected conversation piece and the thought was that the home might be filled with such connected devices. By 2008 he realized that the connected world would evolve a bit differently and so started building out Mother, a connected hub with generic motion sensors that could be programmed to perform specific tasks with the toggle of the app.

Now the CEO of Sen.se, which makes the Mother, Haladjian discusses his thought evolution and where he thinks the internet of things is headed on this week's podcast. Before that, Kevin Tofel and I talk about GE's big industrial internet news, my tests of the Mother and answer a reader's question about buying a smart coffee maker.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Kevin Tofel and Rafi Haladjian, CEO of Sen.se.

Direct download: 101314_02-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:03 PM

johnsons

This week's show concludes with an interview with Ann and Bobby Johnson, the husband and wife behind a new analytics startup called Interana. We covered the company earlier this week, but dive even deeper in the podcast, including with a discussion about why, for the Johnsons at least, it was easier to start a business together than many might imagine.

But the really interesting part of Interana is the technology and the vision, much of which stems from the work Bobby and third co-founder Lior Abraham did during their tenures at Facebook. Interana is a custom-built engine for storing, analyzing and visualizing massive amount of event data, and it's meant to be usable by large numbers of employees.

So listen up. You might just learn something about analytics, corporate divestitures and even ... love.

Direct download: 100914_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 4:09 PM

Direct download: 100714_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:Technology -- posted at: 4:15 PM

Backup cameras, adaptive steering, lane guidance systems and even automated parallel parking exist in today's cars, which means that by any definition they are smart. But they can't yet drive themselves, which is why we had Kristen Parrish, a researcher at Texas Instrument's Kilby Labs come on the podcast this week to talk about when we'll reach the tipping point for automated vehicles.Parrish explains some of the technologies involved, and covers some of the technical and regulatory elements we'll have to contend with as our vehicles learn to drive themselves.

Before we discuss cars, Kevin Tofel and I answer a reader's question about what type of garage door monitoring system he should use and talk about Google's plans to build a URL-based framework for finding connected devices that are nearby. I like the idea, but am curious how it could play out. Kevin and I also discussed some new HVAC technology, including a Kickstarter project that gives your old window A/C unit Nest-like learning and remote-temperature-control capabilities. Check it out.

Host: Stacey Higginbotham
Guests: Kevin Tofel and Kristen Parrish, a researcher at TI's Kilby Labs.

Direct download: 100614_01-AudioMp3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:12 AM